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The Carpenter Comeith!!!Little by Little the “coffin” is being exposed……via e-mail to admin/capecoral

In Banking, Business, Business/Political Trends Worldwide, currency, Money and Finances, Offshore accounts, personal and business, Political parties, Taxes on July 22, 2011 at 4:56 pm
This is CRAP!!!! 
It is just like everything in this administration.
Too bad we didn’t kick out enough of Obama’s idiots from the Senate as well.Watch for this AFTER November elections; remember
this BEFORE you VOTE in case you think Obama’s
looking out for your best interest.1% tax on all bank transactions HR 4646This government just cannot think of enough ways
to hurt the American people!This Bill must die
FORWARD THIS TO EVERYONE YOU KNOW!

1% tax on all bank transactions
HR 4646 ANOTHER NEW OBAMA TAX SLIPPED IN WHILE WE WERE ASLEEP.
Checked this on snopes , it’s true! Check out HR 4646.  (see below copied from Snopes)

President Obama’s finance team is recommending a
one percent (1%) transaction fee (TAX). Obama’s
plan is to sneak it in after the November
elections to keep it under the radar.

This is a 1% tax on all transactions at any
financial institution – banks , credit unions ,
savings and loans , etc. Any deposit you make , or
even a transfer within your account , will have a
1% tax charged.

If your paycheck or your social security or
whatever is direct deposit , it will get a 1% tax
charged for the transaction.

If your paycheck is $1000 , then you will pay
Obama $10 just for the privilege of depositing
your paycheck in your bank. Even if you hand carry
your paycheck or any check into your bank for a
deposit , 1% tax will be charged.

You receive a $5 , 000 stock dividend from your
broker , Obama takes $50 just to allow you to
deposit that check in the bank..

If you take $1 , 000 cash to deposit at your bank ,
1% tax will be charged.

Mind you , this is from the man who promised that ,
if you make under $250 , 000 per year , you will not
see one penny of new tax. Keep your eyes and ears
open , you will be amazed at what you learn about
this guy’s under-the-table moves to increase the
number of ways you are taxed.

Oh , and by the way , you receive a refund from
the IRS next year and you have it direct
deposited or you walk in to deposit that check ,
you guessed it. You will pay a 1% charge of that
money just for putting it in your bank. Remember ,
any money , cash , check or whatever , no matter
where it came from , you will pay a 1% fee if you
put it in the bank.

Some will say , oh well , it’s just 1%. Are you
kidding me? It’s a 1% tax increase across the
board. Remember , once the tax is there , they can
also raise it at will.. And if anyone protests , they will just say ,
“oh , that’s not really a tax , it’s a user fee”! Think this is no
big deal? Go back and look at the transactions you
made from last year’s banking statements. Then add
the total of all those transactions and deduct 1%..
Still think it’s no big deal???     Vicki

In which square hole does your round Peg fit?????

1. snopes.com: Debt Free America Act ⤢⤢⤢
Is the U.S. government proposing a 1% tax on debit card
usage and/or
banking transactions?
…It is true. The bill is HR-4646 introduced by US Rep Peter
deFazio D-Oregon and US Senator Tom Harkin D-Iowa. Their plan is
to sneak it in after the…
…moved beyond proposing studies and submitted the Debt Free
America Act (H.R. 4646) , a bill calling for the implementation of
a scheme to pay down the…
…[2010] by Rep. Chaka Fattah (D-Pa.). His “Debt Free America
Act” (H.R. 4646) would impose a 1 percent “transaction tax” on
every financial transaction…
Tue , 12 Oct 2010 11:26:37 GMT
http://www.snopes.com/politics/taxes/debtfree.asp

Sovereign Man Notes from the Field Date: July 8, 2011 Reporting From: Sofia, Bulgaria

In Banking, Business, Business/Political Trends Worldwide, Constitution of The United States, currency, Jobs in Cape Coral, Local news and Opinion, Medicine, Offshore accounts, Personal on July 8, 2011 at 1:25 pm

Sovereign Man

Notes from the Field

Date: July 8, 2011
Reporting From: Sofia, Bulgaria
Folks… you just can’t make this stuff up.On July 6th, just two days ago, at least a dozen busybody Congressmen sponsored the introduction ofHR 2411, the “Reduce America’s Debt Now Act of 2011.” They always come up with fantastic names for these pieces of legislation… and rest assured, the better/more patriotic the name, the more ominous the bill. This one follows the pattern.

HR 2411 states that every worker in America should be able to voluntarily have a portion of his/her wages automatically withheld and sent directly to the Treasury Department for the purposes of paying down the federal debt.

“Every employer making payment of wages shall deduct and withhold upon such wages any amounts so elected, and shall pay such amounts over to the Secretary of the Treasury…”

That’s right. Uncle Sam is so broke that he wants to give all the good little Americans out there the opportunity to contribute an even greater portion of their paychecks to finance government largess.

Desperate? Hmmm…. Don’t worry, it gets better.

Obviously, if an employee feels so compelled and should elect to have a portion of his/her paycheck withheld, the onus of responsibility is now on the employer to make it happen. The employer has to do all the paperwork, withhold the money, send the payment to the Treasury, maintain the account records, and probably submit to all kinds of new filing requirements.

You can imagine that, if passed, the bill will result in a host of new IRS regulations, complete with a battery of penalties for employers who don’t fill out the paperwork properly, submit filings on time, or make some administrative mistake.

Think about it: if a small business owner has one single employee who is dumb enough to think that it’s his patriotic duty to pay down the debt and decides to contribute $1/month, that owner will have the responsibility for all kinds of new forms and filings, plus submit to new ‘debt reduction audits.’

But don’t worry, it gets even better.

So let’s say there are millions of sheep out there who elect to donate a portion of their toil and sweat so that the Chinese and big financial institutions don’t have to worry about an American default. How does Congress plan on rewarding its most patriotic citizens? By sticking it to them on their taxes, of course.

HR 2411 stipulates that any contribution made to the Treasury in order to pay down the federal debt IS NOT TAX DEDUCTIBLE.

“The [Treasury] Secretary shall include. . . a reasonably conspicuous statement that any amounts deducted and withheld from wages. . .  are not deductible as charitable contributions for Federal income tax purposes.”

Imagine this scenario: You make $100,000/year. In a fit of complete insanity, you decide that you want to withhold your entire annual salary to pay down the debt. Hey, you can always move in with mom for the next year, right?

Well guess what– Uncle Sam will gladly take your money… and then STILL expect you to pay taxes on the $100,000 that you earned, so you’d have to come out of pocket with an additional $40,000 or so.

Don’t worry, though. The Social Security and Medicare wages are reduced by the amount that you withhold, making you only liable for state and federal taxes. Seems like a good deal, eh comrades?

There are so many things utterly wrong with his piece of legislation, it’s hard to know where to begin other than by saying that such intellectual and philosophical perversion is only capable of springing from unprincipled sociopaths whose sole capability is the destruction of value.

There’s a great quote from Atlas Shrugged that comes to mind which sums this all up:

“[W]hen you see that in order to produce, you need to obtain permission from men who produce nothing; when you see that money is flowing to those who deal not in goods, but in favors; when you see that men get rich more easily by graft than by work, and your laws no longer protect you against them, but protect them against you. . . you may know that your society is doomed.”

We’ve discussed the story of the boiling frog so many times before– a frog, when put into a pot of water and slowly brought to a boil, doesn’t realize that he’s in danger until its too late. I think the boiling frog just got a little hotter. Have you hit your breaking point yet?


Until tomorrow,

Simon Black
Senior Editor, SovereignMan.com 
This article appears courtesy of <a href="http://www.sovereignman.com">SovereignMan.com: Notes From The
Field</a>, a free newsletter dedicated to individual freedom,
internationalization, asset protection and global finance. For a
complimentary subscription, visit <a href="http://www.sovereignman.com">http://www.SovereignMan.com</a>


Sovereign Man Notes from the Field Date: May 16, 2011 Reporting From: Santiago, Chile

In Banking, Business, Business/Political Trends Worldwide, Interesting places, Jobs in Cape Coral, Marine Info., Medical treatment, Offshore accounts, Political, Taxes on May 16, 2011 at 2:01 pm

Sovereign Man

Notes from the Field

Date: May 16, 2011
Reporting From: Santiago, Chile

On June 10, 1215 AD, after prolonged rebellion and frustrating negotiation, a group of England’s most influential barons entered London to force the disastrous King John Softsword into accepting a revolutionary charter of individual freedoms.

Five days later in the Runnymede meadow of Surrey County, John affixed his royal seal onto what became known as the Magna Carta. It still exists on the books today in England and Wales.

This document was one of the more important antecedents to the US Constitution; its proclamations ended the absolutism of England’s monarchy and spelled out very clear rights and freedoms, including, among others, the right of a man to enjoy his private property without trespass from government officials.

Over 550 years later, the framers of the Constitution codified this right in the 4th Amendment to be secure in one’s private property. Last week, the Indiana Supreme Court effectively rejected both documents in two separate cases.

In the first case of Lacey v. State of Indiana, the Court ruled that police officers serving a warrant on a private home may simply walk right in without knocking.

The second case of Barnes v. State of Indiana is far more startling. The case deals with one Richard Barnes, a regular Joe citizen of Indiana, who was in the midst of marital problems with his wife one evening in 2007. The couple was arguing when police arrived to the scene and attempted to enter the home.

Barnes made it very clear to the officers that they were not to enter his home. The officers did not have a warrant, and they did not have probably cause to believe that anything illegal was happening. But they entered regardless.

Barnes tried to block the door, and as the police officers muscled their way past him, he shoved one of them against the wall in defense of his property. Barnes was choked and tasered in his own home, subsequently hospitalized, then charged with misdemeanor battery on a police officer.

The case went to court, and the Barnes defense team cited a private citizen’s right to resist unlawful entry into one’s home. They lost. The case was appealed, all the way up to the Indiana Supreme Court. Here’s where it gets interesting.

The Court agreed that the police officers entered the Barnes home illegally. The Court further agreed that one’s right to resist illegal entry has existed since the Magna Carta. The Court further agreed that the US Supreme Court has reaffirmed this right to resist unlawful entry in numerous court cases.

Seems pretty cut and dry, no?

Yet, in summarizing the court’s opinion, Justice Steven David writes, “We hold that there is -no right- to reasonably resist unlawful entry by police officers.”

Wait. Full stop. A citizen has no right to resist unlawful entry by police officers on his private property? Apparently we’re all supposed to lay down like two-toed tree sloths while these jackbooted monkeys turn private property into yet another ‘rights free’ zone.

Americans already have to put up with dispensation of the Constitution at airports, border checkpoints, political events, many train station, and soon to be bus terminals and shopping malls. We’d better add ‘private residence’ to that list as well.

The right to protect oneself and one’s property against unlawful entry is the hallmark of any free civilization. Conversely, it is the hallmark of a totalitarian police state when government goons have the authority to go stomping around on private property without oversight of a judicious, impartial court.

There is no middle ground here… and a government that is on the way to denying this right is not far down the road from denying other basic, seemingly no-brainer rights– like assembly, criticizing the government, and possession of firearms.

One of the reasons I travel so much is so I don’t have to deal with this kind of nonsense. I enjoy spending time in countries where I have no fear of some government agent forcing his way into my home.

There are a number of such places in the world– Chile is definitely one of them.

Until tomorrow,

Simon Black
Senior Editor, SovereignMan.com

This article appears courtesy of SovereignMan.com: Notes From The
Field
, a free newsletter dedicated to individual freedom,
internationalization, asset protection and global finance. For a
complimentary subscription, visit http://www.SovereignMan.com

PS for SMC Members: Your monthly premium edition will be sent out momentarily. I’m particularly excited about this edition because we have managed to negotiate a way for you to establish a bank account in Singapore at one of its strongest banks without having to visit the country! Stay tuned for details.

This article appears courtesy of SovereignMan.com: Notes From The
Field
, a free newsletter dedicated to individual freedom,
internationalization, asset protection and global finance. For a
complimentary subscription, visit http://www.SovereignMan.com

Sovereign Man Notes from the Field Date: April 25, 2011 Reporting From: En route from Santa Cruz, Bolivia

In Banking, Business, Business/Political Trends Worldwide, Continental Travel, Jobs, Medical treatment, personal and business, renminbi currency, Sovereign Man on April 25, 2011 at 4:15 pm

Sovereign Man
Notes from the Field

Date: April 25, 2011
Reporting From: En route from Santa Cruz, Bolivia

[Editor’s note: Simon put an unusual amount of photos in today’s letter, you can see all of them online.]

Anyone who has any doubt that central planning and corruption destroys an economy should head to Bolivia. The country is a classic example of a resource-rich nation whose economic potential has been squandered by socialism.

It wasn’t always this way. Bolivia has had several periods of prosperity in its relatively brief history; in the late 1800s, for example, the price of gold began to rise dramatically against silver which was backing many currencies at the time such as the US dollar. (see chart).

Bolivia’s mining industry dates back to the 16th century, and as the country was rich with gold, its economy prospered. The good times lasted until the global depression in the 1930s when Bolivia and Paraguay went to war over the Chaco, each side thinking there was oil underneath the ground.

Following a terrible defeat and a resurgence of tough times, a number of revolutionary movements sprouted around the country. These took hold for several decades, eventually leading to a series of failed military dictatorships that were finally abandoned in the 1980s.

With an inflation rate of roughly 25,000%, Bolivia’s new market-oriented government took immediate steps to liberalize the economy, reduce capital and trade barriers, privatize state-owned companies, and attract foreign investment.

By 1985, the economy was heading back on track, and the prosperity lasted through the early 2000s when nationwide turmoil broke out over the fate of Bolivia’s massive natural gas reserves.

In light of new gas discoveries near Santa Cruz, the government provided concessions to a group of foreign companies who were willing to invest the necessary intellectual and financial capital to exploit the reserves. This move was widely opposed by many Bolivians and resulted in violent protests.

Ultimately, socialist presidential candidate Evo Morales was elected in 2006 and began his tradition of May Day nationalization decrees, starting with the natural gas reserves.

Morales considers himself a champion of the poor, and his stated aim is to distribute the profit from Bolivia’s resources among the people. Certainly, there is a large contingent of the population within Bolivia that lives in abject poverty, and their prospects have changed little over the years.

Socialists like Morales think that you can cure poverty by throwing money at the problem. They believe that by confiscating profits from evil capitalists and sprinkling them among the poor, they can lift people out of poverty.

This is a logical failure. Poverty isn’t caused by a lack of money… it’s caused by the lack of ability or opportunity to create value. Showering poor people with money does not address this problem, just ask any millionaire lottery winner who’s ended up back in the trailer park.

Like an incompetent physician who routinely misdiagnoses an ailment, socialism tries to treat the symptoms of poverty rather than address its root cause. Consequently, these measures ultimately end up as catastrophic failures.

The most common play is to vastly expand the size of government and hire legions of new workers. To give you an example, there is a network of toll roads outside of Santa Cruz. You pay the toll, not for the upkeep of the roads (which are in terrible condition), but to pay the salary of the guy who collects the toll.

Army bases are everywhere in Bolivia. You can’t drive 30 kilometers without passing some sort of military installation where a bunch of jackbooted monkeys are parading around waiting for the Brazilians to invade.

Perhaps the best example is at the airport.

When you want to leave Bolivia, there is first a three-step check-in procedure. Following that, you have to stand in another line to pay the airport departure tax. Needless to say, this revenue doesn’t go to improve the airport, but to pay the salaries of the people who collect the tax.

Following that is the passport border control, another line. Following that is an INTERPOL check, yet another line. Following that is narco-trafficking checkpoint, where they go through your carry-on baggage looking for drugs.

In my case, the inspecting officer actually sniffed my iPad, leading me to believe he was either heeding
New York Fed President Bill Dudley’s culinary advice, or honestly thought that I could manage to pack the circuitry full of cocaine without damaging the touch screen functionality.

After that is yet another line for final customs clearing. The whole process takes 2-hours on a good day.

Each of these people along the way has a job… yet not a single one of them is adding any value or gaining any valuable experience. The net effect of such policies cascading across the entire economy has been unmitigated wealth destruction.

Deep down, Bolivia is a nice country. It’s incredibly cheap, the people are friendly, the women are attractive, and the weather is quite nice. But it truly takes a special person to be able to deal with the constant misgivings and inefficiencies in this centrally planned state.

When I compare Bolivia to it’s southern neighbor Chile– clean, modern, developed, civilized, market-oriented– it’s a night and day difference.

Fundamentally, these are the same people who have taken two completely different paths. One leads to wealth and is a great example of how a pro-market, limited government can benefit society. The other leads to poverty, and is the clearest example of what happens when politicians drive an economy.

Where do you stand– is it possible to eradicate poverty by giving out money for free? Let me know what you think.

Until tomorrow,

Simon Black
Senior Editor, SovereignMan.com

This article appears courtesy of SovereignMan.com: Notes From The
Field
, a free newsletter dedicated to individual freedom,
internationalization, asset protection and global finance. For a
complimentary subscription, visit http://www.SovereignMan.com

Sovereign Man Notes from the Field Date: February 18, 2011 Reporting From: Panama City, Panama

In Banking, Continental Travel, Expatriation, Money and Finances, Offshore accounts, Opportunity, personal and business, Taxes, Travel on February 18, 2011 at 8:37 pm

Sovereign Man
Notes from the Field
Date: February 18, 2011
Reporting From: Panama City, Panama

Greetings,

This is Holly Pain for Simon Black. As I write this, Simon is onstage, addressing more than 300 people in Panama City, Panama as we begin our unique workshop on internationalizing your life and assets.

Attendees will start taking action right here at the conference, meeting with our experts and starting the process of gaining more freedom and opportunity.

Simon has invited a cadre of his most highly esteemed and personally vetted contacts from around the world to enlighten us about the legalities and logistics of opening banks accounts abroad, gaining second (or third) passports, creating offshore structures and generally becoming more sovereign and independent.

He has also created a workbook full of all the documents attendees need to start taking action right now, here in Panama.

To our knowledge, there’s no other workshop that combines the depth and breadth of knowledge — actionable knowledge — that we’re presenting here.

Today we’re hearing from experts who specialize in:

* International Asset Protection;

* Planting Business Flags in Singapore, Marshall Islands, Cook Islands, Switzerland, Hong Kong and Nevis, among other places;

* Planting Financial Flags in Ecuador, Belize, Hong Kong, Cyprus and Western Europe; and,

* Gaining Residency and/or Citizenship in at least a dozen jurisdictions — St. Kitts, New Zealand, Uruguay, and the EU among them.

We’re tweeting live from Panama (@thesovereignman) with updates throughout the weekend.

We’re also recording the whole thing so that those who cannot be here can learn everything we’re learning and achieve the same access to these dynamic specialists that we have.

More soon.

Until tomorrow,
Holly Pain
SovereignMan.com

This article appears courtesy of SovereignMan.com: Notes From The
Field
, a free newsletter dedicated to individual freedom,
internationalization, asset protection and global finance. For a
complimentary subscription, visit http://www.SovereignMan.com

Still More Things to Think About……….via E-Mail

In Banking, Business, Business/Political Trends Worldwide, History, Jobs, Jobs in Cape Coral, Money and Finances, Offshore accounts, Opportunity, personal and business, Political, Political parties, Taxes, Travel on December 2, 2010 at 3:53 pm

Turn Out the Lights ..the Party is Over. This is long , probable, and scary .. Do not know the accuracy or the writer …..

There is nothing political about this email.

It simply points out very probable changes that are in our future.

CHANGES ARE COMING —-
Whether these changes are good or bad depends in part on how we adapt to them. But, ready or not, here they come

1. The Post Office. Get ready to imagine a world without the post office. They are so deeply in financial trouble that there is probably no way to sustain it long term. Email, Fed Ex, and UPS have just about wiped out the minimum revenue needed to keep the post office alive. Most of your mail every day is junk mail and bills.

2. The Check. Britain is already laying the groundwork to do away with checks by 2018. It costs the financial system billions of dollars a year to process checks. Plastic cards and online transactions will lead to the eventual demise of the check. This plays right into the death of the post office. If you never paid your bills by mail and never received them by mail, the post office would absolutely go out of business.

3. The Newspaper. The younger generation simply doesn’t read the newspaper. They certainly don’t subscribe to a daily delivered print edition. That may go the way of the milkman and the laundry man. As for reading the paper online, get ready to pay for it. The rise in mobile Internet devices and e-readers has caused all the newspaper and magazine publishers to form an alliance. They have met with Apple, Amazon, and the major cell phone companies to develop a model for paid subscription services.

4. The Book. You say you will never give up the physical book that you hold in your hand and turn the literal pages. I said the same thing about downloading music from i Tune’s. I wanted my hard copy CD. But I quickly changed my mind when I discovered that I could get albums for half the price without ever leaving home to get the latest music. The same thing will happen with books. You can browse a bookstore online and even read a preview chapter before you buy. And the price is less than half that of a real book. And think of the convenience! Once you start flicking your fingers on the screen instead of the book, you find that you are lost in the story, can’t wait to see what happens next, and you forget that you’re holding a gadget instead of a book.

5. The Land Line Telephone. Unless you have a large family and make a lot of local calls, you don’t need it anymore. Most people keep it simply because they’ve always had it. But you are paying double charges for that extra service. All the cell phone companies will let you call customers using the same cell provider for no charge against your minutes
.
6. Music. This is one of the saddest parts of the change story. The music industry is dying a slow death. Not just because of illegal downloading. It’s the lack of innovative new music being given a chance to get to the people who would like to hear it. Greed and corruption is the problem. The record labels and the radio conglomerates are simply self-destructing. Over 40% of the music purchased today is “catalog items,” meaning traditional music that the public is familiar with. Older established artists. This is also true on the live concert circuit. To explore this fascinating and disturbing topic further, check out the book, “Appetite for Self-Destruction” by Steve Knopper, and the video documentary, “Before the Music Dies.”

7. Television. Revenues to the networks are down dramatically. Not just because of the economy. People are watching TV and movies streamed from their computers. And they’re playing games and doing lots of other things that take up the time that used to be spent watching TV. Prime time shows have degenerated down to lower than the lowest common denominator. Cable rates are skyrocketing and commercials run about every 4 minutes and 30 seconds. I say good riddance to most of it. It’s time for the cable companies to be put out of our misery. Let the people choose what they want to watch online and through Netflix.

8. The “Things” That You Own. Many of the very possessions that we used to own are still in our lives, but we may not actually own them in the future. They may simply reside in “the cloud.” Today your computer has a hard drive and you store your pictures, music, movies, and documents. Your software is on a CD or DVD, and you can always re-install it if need be. But all of that is changing. Apple, Microsoft, and Google are all finishing up their latest “cloud services.” That means that when you turn on a computer, the Internet will be built into the operating system. So, Windows, Google, and the Mac OS will be tied straight into the Internet. If you click an icon, it will open something in the Internet cloud. If you save something, it will be saved to the cloud. And you may pay a monthly subscription fee to the cloud provider.
In this virtual world, you can access your music or your books, or your whatever from any laptop or handheld device. That’s the good news. But, will you actually own any of this “stuff” or will it all be able to disappear at any moment in a big “Poof?” Will most of the things in our lives be disposable and whimsical? It makes you want to run to the closet and pull out that photo album, grab a book from the shelf, or open up a CD case and pull out the insert.

9. Privacy. If there ever was a concept that we can look back on nostalgically, it would be privacy. That’s gone. It’s been gone for a long time anyway. There are cameras on the street, in most of the buildings, and even built into your computer and cell phone. But you can be sure that 24/7, “They” know who you are and where you are, right down to the GPS coordinates, and the Google Street View. If you buy something, your habit is put into a zillion profiles, and your ads will change to reflect those habits. And “They” will try to get you to buy something else. Again and again.

All we will have that can’t be changed are Memories.

19 Facts About The Deindustrialization Of America That Will Blow Your Mind

The United States is rapidly becoming the very first “post-industrial” nation on the globe. All great economic empires eventually become fat and lazy and squander the great wealth that their forefathers have left them, but the pace at which America is accomplishing this is absolutely amazing. It was America that was at the forefront of the industrial revolution. It was America that showed the world how to mass produce everything from automobiles to televisions to airplanes. It was the great American manufacturing base that crushed Germany and Japan in World War II.

But now we are witnessing the deindustrialization of America . Tens of thousands of factories have left the United States in the past decade alone. Millions upon millions of manufacturing jobs have been lost in the same time period. The United States has become a nation that consumes everything in sight and yet produces increasingly little. Do you know what our biggest export is today? Waste paper. Yes, trash is the number one thing that we ship out to the rest of the world as we voraciously blow our money on whatever the rest of the world wants to sell to us. The United States has become bloated and spoiled and our economy is now just a shadow of what it once was. Once upon a time America could literally out produce the rest of the world combined. Today that is no longer true, but Americans sure do consume more than anyone else in the world. If the deindustrialization of America continues at this current pace, what possible kind of a future are we going to be leaving to our children?

Any great nation throughout history has been great at making things. So if the United States continues to allow its manufacturing base to erode at a staggering pace how in the world can the U.S. continue to consider itself to be a great nation? We have created the biggest debt bubble in the history of the world in an effort to maintain a very high standard of living, but the current state of affairs is not anywhere close to sustainable. Every single month America goes into more debt and every single month America gets poorer.

So what happens when the debt bubble pops?

The deindustrialization of the United States should be a top concern for every man, woman and child in the country. But sadly, most Americans do not have any idea what is going on around them.

For people like that, take this article and print it out and hand it to them. Perhaps what they will read below will shock them badly enough to awaken them from their slumber.

The following are 19 facts about the deindustrialization of America that will blow your mind….

#1 The United States has lost approximately 42,400 factories since 2001. About 75 percent of those factories employed over 500 people when they were still in operation.

#2 Dell Inc., one of America ’s largest manufacturers of computers, has announced plans to dramatically expand its operations in China with an investment of over $100 billion over the next decade.

#3 Dell has announced that it will be closing its last large U.S. manufacturing facility in Winston-Salem , North Carolina in November. Approximately 900 jobs will be lost.

#4 In 2008, 1.2 billion cell phones were sold worldwide. So how many of them were manufactured inside the United States ? Zero.

#5 According to a new study conducted by the Economic Policy Institute, if the U.S. trade deficit with China continues to increase at its current rate, the U.S. economy will lose over half a million jobs this year alone.

#6 As of the end of July, the U.S. trade deficit with China had risen 18 percent compared to the same time period a year ago.

#7 The United States has lost a total of about 5.5 million manufacturing jobs since October 2000.

#8 According to Tax Notes, between 1999 and 2008 employment at the foreign affiliates of U.S. parent companies increased an astounding 30 percent to 10.1 million. During that exact same time period, U.S. employment at American multinational corporations declined 8 percent to 21.1 million.

#9 In 1959, manufacturing represented 28 percent of U.S. economic output. In 2008, it represented 11.5 percent.

#10 Ford Motor Company recently announced the closure of a factory that produces the Ford Ranger in St. Paul , Minnesota . Approximately 750 good paying middle class jobs are going to be lost because making Ford Rangers in Minnesota does not fit in with Ford’s new “global” manufacturing strategy.

#11 As of the end of 2009, less than 12 million Americans worked in manufacturing. The last time less than 12 million Americans were employed in manufacturing was in 1941.

#12 In the United States today, consumption accounts for 70 percent of GDP. Of this 70 percent, over half is spent on services.

#13 The United States has lost a whopping 32 percent of its manufacturing jobs since the year 2000.

#14 In 2001, the United States ranked fourth in the world in per capita broadband Internet use. Today it ranks 15th.

#15 Manufacturing employment in the U.S. computer industry is actually lower in 2010 than it was in 1975.

#16 Printed circuit boards are used in tens of thousands of different products. Asia now produces 84 percent of them worldwide.

#17 The United States spends approximately $3.90 on Chinese goods for every $1 that the Chinese spend on goods from the United States .

#18 One prominent economist is projecting that the Chinese economy will be three times larger than the U.S. economy by the year 2040.

#19 The U.S. Census Bureau says that 43.6 million Americans are now living in poverty and according to them that is the highest number of poor Americans in the 51 years that records have been kept.

So how many tens of thousands more factories do we need to lose before we do something about it?

How many millions more Americans are going to become unemployed before we all admit that we have a very, very serious problem on our hands?

How many more trillions of dollars are going to leave the country before we realize that we are losing wealth at a pace that is killing our economy?

How many once great manufacturing cities are going to become rotting war zones like Detroit before we understand that we are committing national economic suicide?

The deindustrialization of America is a national crisis. It needs to be treated like one.

America is in deep, deep trouble folks. It is time to wake up.

Stand Up Folks and Help Do Something to Turn this Around….

In Banking, Business, Business/Political Trends Worldwide, Continental Travel, Expatriation, Government, History, Jobs, Money and Finances, Offshore accounts, personal and business, Political, Taxes, Travel on December 2, 2010 at 3:42 pm

Sovereign Man
Notes from the Field

Date: December 2, 2010
Reporting From: Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

A few days ago, I wrote an article on the merits of productive citizens leaving their home countries that are no longer aligned with the values of freedom and independence.

I find this ‘starve the beast’ approach to be the most effective non-violent method to affect change… and needless to say, this notion stirred quite a bit of controversy.

Among many other blogs, the article was also noticed and re-posted by ZeroHedge.com, one of my favorite financial websites. Many of the comments on that site were downright angry, calling me cowardly and weak-minded for even suggesting the notion of expatriation.

Needless to say, I found this reaction to be a desperate reach by the institutionalized, and the editors of ZeroHedge.com agreed to publish my response.

If you’d like to read it on ZeroHedge.com, click here:

Until tomorrow,

Simon Black
Senior Editor, SovereignMan.com

This article appears courtesy of SovereignMan.com: Notes From The
Field
, a free newsletter dedicated to individual freedom,
internationalization, asset protection and global finance. For a
complimentary subscription, visit http://www.SovereignMan.com

Sovereign Man Notes from the Field Date: December 1, 2010 Reporting From: Katoomba, New South Wales, Australia

In Banking, Business, Business/Political Trends Worldwide, Continental Travel, Government, History, Interesting places, Money and Finances, Taxes, Travel on December 2, 2010 at 3:37 pm

Sovereign Man
Notes from the Field

Date: December 1, 2010
Reporting From: Katoomba, New South Wales, Australia

It all started a week ago. National Australia Bank, one of the largest in the country, had a technical malfunction in its core system. Within hours, a simple problem had practically brought a large part of Australia’s banking system to its knees. It was a crazy turn of events.

You see, banks don’t use regular operating systems or database applications; they run specialty software that is intended to synchronize complex operations like cash deposits, overnight interbank drafts, central bank facilities, electronic transfers, credit card monitoring, and a host of sensitive data.

When something goes wrong, it can throw the entire system into disarray, and customers end up getting hurt.

In NAB’s case, a corrupt file overloaded the bank’s payment system, and this single failure eventually cascaded to other parts of their operations.

Much to their surprise and fury, many customers found that their account balances had been blotted out, automatic payments (mortgages, car payments, insurance premiums) had not been drafted, and payment cards no longer functioned.

Because of NAB’s relative size in the country, the bank’s infrastructure handles transactions for many of Australia’s smaller banks, so those banks’ customers were affected too.

This is similar, for example, to how Citi in New York processes international transactions on behalf of many small community banks in
the United States. If something happens to Citi’s technical architecture, all of the other banks are affected.

I met several folks over the weekend who were hit by NAB’s system failure– the stories were generally the same… people with a cart full of groceries at the checkout line unable to pay for their food. Needless to say, the ATMs weren’t working either, and no one would accept checks.

NAB worked feverishly all weekend trying to fix the problem, and locals prepared for a lean couple of days while they waited for access to their cash. Even today (a week later), several thousand NAB accounts are still frozen, and people are unable to withdraw their own money.

It’s unclear yet if the ultimate cause was a pure technical glitch or a malicious attack. Bank IT security systems are far from impenetrable, and the recent StuxNet virus (which can bring down complex infrastructure control systems) shows how sophisticated some electronic attacks are becoming.

Now, I’m not one to live in a state of fear and paranoia for what may or may not happen in the future… but it would be outright foolish to dismiss the possibility that many of the basic systems we take for granted may experience failure.

I’ve seen it before in many parts of the world, including North America and Europe– no fuel at the gas stations, limited food supplies at the grocery store, long-term power outages, etc. NAB’s very public failure demonstrates another important example.

Common sense preparedness is key, and one of the ways to do that is through sovereign diversification. In the case of banking, it’s reasonable to assume that what affects one set of banks in one jurisdiction will likely not affect other banks in other jurisdictions.

Let’s say you’re from Toronto and wake up one morning to find your Canadian bank accounts frozen; if you have some savings stashed away at another bank in Hong Kong, Singapore, or Labuan, then you will still have access to cash, and hence still be able to put food on the table for your family.

It may also be beneficial to keep some amount of hard currency on hand, particularly US dollars, euros, pounds sterling, and Swiss francs in that order. These are the most widely recognized currencies in the world that people are most likely to accept for normal transactions.

Though not yet broadly accepted as media of exchange, gold and silver are also solid additions to an emergency cash hoard. I recommend widely circulated coins over bars– the coins are more recognizable and don’t need to be weighed or assayed.

I also believe in having an escape pad outside of your home country– this is beneficial for many reasons, including the possibility for financial return, being able to move large sums of money overseas, and having a place to go if/when you hit the eject button.

The sustainable community that I plan on launching next year will be exactly this sort of place– functional, sustainable, and designed for system failure. I look forward to discussing the concept further with you in future letters, as well as at our upcoming offshore workshop.

Until tomorrow,

Simon Black
Senior Editor, SovereignMan.com

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This article appears courtesy of SovereignMan.com: Notes From The
Field
, a free newsletter dedicated to individual freedom,
internationalization, asset protection and global finance. For a
complimentary subscription, visit http://www.SovereignMan.com

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